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Sept. 14, 2022

122. Boardwalk Wealth with Omar Khan

122. Boardwalk Wealth with Omar Khan

Join Mike Cavaggioni with Omar Khan on the 122nd episode of the Average Joe Finances Podcast. Omar shares his strategies for developing strong relationships with private and institutional investors, brokers, and strategic partners.

In this episode, you’ll learn:

  • How Boardwalk Wealth is purchasing businesses
  • The difference between real estate assets and business assets
  • How to negotiate with future investors
  • What characteristics to look for reliable operators
  • And so much more!

About Omar Khan:

Omar Khan, CFA is the Founder & Managing Partner of Boardwalk Wealth, a private equity firm specializing in multifamily apartment syndications as well as quick service restaurants, in addition to other alternative investments.

Omar has advised on $3.7 billion in capital financing and M&A transactions, as well as securing $50+ million in equity from private and institutional capital. He is a graduate from the Rotman School of Business (University of Toronto), and a CFA charter holder with 10+ years of investing experience across real estate and commodities. As the principal of Boardwalk Wealth, he has closed on over $250 million of assets across Texas, Georgia, Florida, and South Dakota.

Find Omar Khan on:
Website: https://www.boardwalkwealth.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/boardwalkwealth
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/boardwalkwealth/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/omark1/
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/boardwalkwealth

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Transcript
Average Joe Finances:

Hey, welcome back to the Average Joe Finances Podcast. I'm your host, Mike Cavaggioni and today's guest is Omar Khan. I'm pretty excited to talk to Omar, I actually met him through Instagram. We were chatting a little bit sharing some stuff on each other's stories. Pretty excited to have this conversation today. Omar's doing some really big things, so Hey, welcome to the show. Thanks for joining me.

Omar Khan:

And thanks for having me. What's going on? Let's get into it.

Average Joe Finances:

Absolutely. Hey, so first question I wanna ask you is the same question I ask everybody that comes on the show and we wanna know a little bit about you and more about your story. So if you could share that with us, how did you get started? Where are you now and how did you get there?

Omar Khan:

So look, my story is somewhat similar to a lot of folks. Like my family, three, four generations. Now everybody's been running businesses, various types, right? So it's if you grow up in an entrepreneurial environment, you get to see all the highs and the lows. There's lots of positives, but contrary to all the hustle porn that we see online, there's lots of negatives as well. You're basically on your own. If you make it, but nobody hears about like the failures, everybody just hears about the successes. So I trying to understand that, but the good things that I took from that experience is understanding that there's always good and bad times and to prepare for those good and bad times is generally right. And My family's fairly financially sophisticated, but they were very upfront. When we were growing up as children about, Hey, what can we afford? What can we not afford? Like how does, how do we afford things? How do we not afford things? Hey, you're lucky here. You're not lucky there. They didn't say you're not lucky there, but Hey, you're lucky to have these things look and, we traveled extensively as a family as well. You get a lot of things. You learn just by observing in your environment, you learn through the process of osmosis. So that was a very good, loving parents that always helps. Loving, educated parents. And then when I went to college, I went, I did typical things like a lot of finance guys, do, big accounting and fans. Got outta college. Got my first jobs in finance, institutionally worked at investment banks, all that sort of stuff. Got my CFA kind of the usual path. But in between I knew that for instance just given maybe my background, maybe my personality type also on top of that, that I always wanted to do something on my own. Hopefully, but, I just never really pulled the trigger for the first 8, 10 years. Cause I was just in that whole career mode thing. And then when I moved from Canada to the US, gosh, what, six, seven years ago, by that time, I was, I got married girl that I was dating. Then I got married, we were deciding, Hey, does she come up to Canada or I moved down to the US, moved down to the US. But by that time, I had been running and structuring deals and doing all of that great experiences, professional experiences. But I also, I developed my personal network. So around that time I realized, okay, I'm in the US, this is really it. This is the place to be. If you wanna run any sort of business, you've got no excuse. Now you've got great experiences. Let's go. Just started going, just started putting one foot after the other. And of course there's a few things along the way, and we can talk about 'em, but that's it. But to be honest with you, a lot of the success is not due to me as due to the fact that child loving parents could surroundings growing up, very supportive and also the fact that now that I live in the US, so I could have done all of these same things, say in, say Canada, where I was literally, I might not have had the same success because the market is very different, right? Doesn't mean Canada's bad. I love Canada. I love Canada, but. It's just that the market here, the market is bigger. People are more entrepreneurial. So a lot of things you do have a, if you are successful, have a multiple effect, whereas in a smaller market, you could maybe work twice as much, but there's just not enough to go around. If you think about it. That's basically what it led to what I do today. And I basically run a private equity firm. We buy a lot of real estate. We've got about $250, $300 million in real estate right now. I also own a couple of other businesses. I'm either shareholders in or we buy out. So the process basically has always been, Hey, how do we make the most amount of money for our partners, for ourselves? And how do we do it in a repeatable, sustainable manner, right? Cause it's no use being great one year and then the next year, just flame out.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah, absolutely. What a background, Omar. That's fantastic. And it's very telling when you're talking about where it stems from, how you had, that upbringing that, that background with a loving family and traveling together and just that whole togetherness, and of course having what the last three generations you said of all business owners and running things and running businesses. So you've, you already came, with this background, so you said you were. What was it for? You were in career mode for like your first eight years, right after you finished up school and everything.

Omar Khan:

Look, Mike, I might have been in career mode. I might also have been in a mode of, Hey, I'm just gonna defer this thing.

Average Joe Finances:

It's pushing it to the right a bit.

Omar Khan:

So you understand, so it, maybe it's a bit of both things you can't really say. That's what I wanted to say now. I was also lucky that the jobs that I got and the people and the learning experiences I had throughout the time, they were also all, not all, most, not all most were meaningful experiences. So I actually ended up taking something from those experiences and then was able to implement those in my business career.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah. That's fair. That's fair. Not really career mode, but you were deferring things and you, you had that entrepreneurial bug was always there, right? Yeah. And then, you met your wife and moved down to the states six years ago. So you already had all this stuff established and in place, like you already knew how to run a business. You already knew all these things. And now you were in the spot where you're like, okay, this is it. I'm gonna make it happen. And you did, right? So you're a private equity firm right now. You said you have over 250 million in real estate assets, but you also buy businesses as well, right? So can we talk about that a little bit? Because, I bring a of people on, I bring a lot of people on and we talk about, a lot, most people that come on this show are real estate investors. And I've talked to other people that do other things, other businesses and everything, but I'm interested to know you know what the firm that you run, how you guys are purchasing businesses and what's the difference between looking at real estate assets that you're gonna purchase versus looking at a business asset that you wanna purchase. What are some of the differences that you normally see between the two?

Omar Khan:

First of all, purchasing business is a lot more complex because number one, with real estate, it's easy to get loans in financing. It's way easier to get loans in financing, right? So this is why you see a proliferation of real estate people. Everybody can be a real estate person. Right? Number one, number two, the level of due diligence is a lot more and a lot of times the due diligence, isn't just like financial or say legal. A lot of this is actually taking a deep dive into qualitative aspects. Hey, is a team good? Or this customer relationships good, all of that. So this is why on that side, the businesses that I've acquired, one is I'm a shareholder and our fitness equipment company, we're launching a restaurant company. Not doesn't own any of the real estate, just the operation. It has taken much longer to do those things and say, I could I, as an example, I have done much bigger real estate deals in a much shorter period of time. But the thing is with most businesses as you'll see is I know everybody likes to say real estate, I'm in real estate, I can tell you this, the top 10 20, 30 riches people in the world, they did not make their money in real estate. They made their money running some business because look, the good and bad part about real estate is that you're operating again within reason, right? You're operating within a narrow brand. So it's not certainly you're gonna go hundred X, but the probability of you losing or going to zero is also very limited. So you're operating in this man and it's a great business, don't get me wrong. But your upside is kept. Whereas see if you hear about a tech business or all these other entrepreneurs, we hear. You hear about the story, guys started off at $5,000 in this garage worth is $20 billion. Okay. That stuff doesn't happen with the real estate people. So the scalability part is while it's very hard to get in, but it's like any other, it's like anything in life, right? The harder it is to get in, the more upside you have once you're there.

Average Joe Finances:

More risk though, investing in a business versus investing real estate.

Omar Khan:

Exactly. And think one other thing, though, just on that point though, the reason why it's also harder is as an example, is because you don't get loans, right? Why don't you get loans? Because lenders, especially banks they're they just don't wanna take any chances. It's just harder and harder. But when you get on the other side and things start working, man, it's game over.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah. That's fair. That's fair. The thing I'm curious about when you're talking about looking at some of these businesses right now, you said you're doing stuff with fitness, right? Fitness and restaurants.

Omar Khan:

Yeah. All of these businesses are sub like $2 million. EBITDA so the valuation might be, say seven to 10 million.

Average Joe Finances:

So are you targeting like established businesses or startups?

Omar Khan:

These are established businesses, but they're not. 40 million businesses you realize they're like three to 10 million businesses.

Average Joe Finances:

Yep. So just small businesses that are. Yeah. And you're just pumping them up.

Omar Khan:

Yeah. And then naturally, so I've done two of those there's fitness equipment company with my buddy in Toronto. Hopefully we can liquidate that and make a good return on our money. But again, those are things also I do to keep myself, to keep your brain power running, right? Yeah. Cause a lot of times you meet people, people doing other things in other industries and that teaches you a lot of things.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah, absolutely. Because if you're just doing the same thing over and over again, it gets very like repetitive, but at the same time, that's also where complacency could set in. And yeah, once, one of the things we say in the military is complacency kills, right? So you can only imagine if you're just doing the same thing over and over again I, I think it's really good that you throw something else in there and that you're looking at, small businesses as well. So that, that's a little different than other people that I've had on here talking about what they invest in. But you do it with a private equity firm, so you've got investors that are coming in. And they're all part of this and, helping fund as you go into these businesses. So with that in mind, what kind of like information are you like are you putting out to your investors? Like when you go from a real estate deal, To a business. Like when you say, Hey, this is the next acquisition we wanna get. Here's what we're looking at. Like what's the difference between looking at the small business that you wanna acquire versus the real estate that you wanna acquire like when it comes to like numbers when it comes to what the capital needed for needed for it is what the, what kind of income is the business making? Are those kind of like the things that you guys are talking about?

Omar Khan:

No, the return structure is roughly the same, because look at the end of the day, I'm gonna be honest with you, man. I don't know about other people. I'm not trying to solve world hunger or world peace. Okay. Only reason why I do real estate or any of these other investing activities is to make money. Okay. Let's just be clear. There is no, everybody loves to talk about their big why and I know everybody wants to hold each other's hands and think kumbaya, I'm just not that type of a guy, man. I just, I lay, I was lucky, I'm very privileged that growing up, I led a comfortable life, nothing to do with myself. Sheer dumb luck of being born in the right house. I just like to continue the group times, hopefully just by working hard to ensure that I can. So for me, the returns are the same. And the whole say, if you talk about how to talk to investors about it, the whole conversations with investors have always been the same. Hey look, all you're trying to do is make money in a repeatable process with a reliable person, right? No, that's all we're trying to do, right? Doesn't matter where the vehicle is.

Average Joe Finances:

The brutal honesty here, people, The brutal hoesty.

Omar Khan:

Money's money. A dollar you get from a business is the same as a dollar you get from real estate. What's the difference.

Average Joe Finances:

Absolutely.

Omar Khan:

As long as you can get it sustainably, repeatedly with the right people, trustworthy people over a period of time. So once you establish that trust, once you establish that track record, all of these. What is this oppositions or objections you hear about? They go away. They don't exist, but you have to get to their level. You start off saying, oh, real estate is the only business in the world you should invest in and then three months later, another opportunity shows up. You're like no, this is the best investment. You can't really say that cuz then you lose credibility.

Average Joe Finances:

Sure. So real estate is probably the most comfortable thing to be in, right? Because like you said, you have that window. And it's very hard to go to zero, like you were saying, but where as a business can flop and it's done, somebody that's running the business can make a bad decision and the business is done. That's one of the crazy things about, it's one of the things we talk about too, like when you're investing in individual stocks, and all of a sudden there's a scandal and a CEO does something crazy or you have an Enron situation and things like that. That can always happen where in real estate it's a matter of Hey, you gotta pay attention to the market and where the market's going in just accordingly. Sometimes with these businesses, you can't tell, right?

Omar Khan:

You can't tell and see, but, and that's where say the excitement is, but that's where the opportunity is also, right? Yeah. That's why if you time it you're lucky, whatever adjectives you want to use, you can 10X, you can hundred X, you can 200 extra money. And that's where great fortunes are made.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah, absolutely. I love it. I love it. And I love the brutal honesty, Omar. It's fantastic. Okay. So I think one of the other things I was looking for too is like, when you're looking at some of these businesses that you wanna acquire, and you said it's more than just, the numbers. Are you looking like into the backgrounds of the people that run into

Omar Khan:

Oh yeah. Of course

Average Joe Finances:

Like how long they've been established or anything like that.

Omar Khan:

Yeah, not just that, because number one, look, even in real estate, by the way, if you have a scammy operator or somebody who doesn't have a good say reputation, they could be doing a lot of shady stuff that you won't know and it's really hard for you, only find out much later.

Average Joe Finances:

You only find out when the asset sells and you're not getting put into it back.

Omar Khan:

The quality of the person is always number one. And again, you gotta understand like a lot of people somehow expect that there's a 16 point checklist to everything, man. I'll just put it in my Excel and this is coming from a finance guy. I'll just put it in my Excel model and a number if it's green. It's great. And if it's, I don't know, red it's bad and most of life doesn't work like that. A lot of the interactions we have, the decisions we take are based on our trust based mechanism. Trust, but verify, but I still gotta trust you starting out. Otherwise we can't even have a conversation. So it's looking into these things, having multiple conversations with people, then understanding simple things like guys telling you, Hey, I've got these great customers. Okay. And they've been with me for five years. Great. That's his opinion, right? You have to go talk to the customers. You'd be like, okay, are you gonna stick with this guy or stick with this company? Why do you wanna stick with this company? Or you go talk to the customers and they could say, Hey, yeah, we just met this guy yesterday. Or yeah, I have a relationship with say, Mike, I don't really give a shit about the business. Then if Mike goes away in whatever one or two years after his earn out, then that customer goes away, then what do you do? How do you get that cash flow? So a lot of these are qualitative aspects, right? As opposed to say a quantitative like you put a number in a box and it Excel picks out.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah. So that, that is one of the bigger differences, too, cuz even in the real estate side, if you're going on a deal with somebody and then, one of the partners walks out and leaves, it's not like you're just gonna jump out because somebody left, right? Where if you're tied to a certain business and you're only involved in that business, Because you're specifically like, that person, you know what they're doing. And then they leave the business and you're just not sure how the business is gonna run without them. Where the real estate's gonna stay pretty steady, cuz everything's already put in place. So that's a very good point. That's a very good point. All right. Awesome. Now. During your intro, when you were talking about your background, everything you said there was multiple things that you you could talk about as you got to where you are today, right? So as you started building your businesses, so I'm a little curious about that. Like when you made that shift to go from being, in, in work mode to entrepreneur mode, and you were moving to the states, was it before or after you came to the states, you said, okay, I'm gonna, I'm gonna start my own

Omar Khan:

after

Average Joe Finances:

Business. Okay. So you got here and said, okay I'm gonna do it.

Omar Khan:

First of all, I was never opposed to the idea of doing it. I just started

Average Joe Finances:

Oh the bug was always there. Like we talked about,

Omar Khan:

You understand a lot of yeah. You understand it. A lot of times you do things and you were like, ah, I should have just done this like ages ago.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah, yep.

Omar Khan:

It was that sort of thing. It wasn't like I was opposed to the concept. It was just. You just kept kicking the can down the road.

Average Joe Finances:

I would say probably every, everybody that's a real estate investor or a business owner will say the same thing. I wish I would've started this years ago. Probably everybody, I even knew a guy actually I had him on my podcast, not too long ago. He was 26 years old and he's oh, I wish I started when I was 23. So it's there's always that, ah, I wish I started younger. But that's the whole point of doing something like this and having a podcast like this is getting this out there, it's great that my audience, I have a lot of people, my age listening to it and some older people. But I also have a lot of younger people. I have I've, my, my metrics show that I have a lot of 18 to 24 year olds that listen to my podcast, which is phenomenal because those are the people I wanna target because I want them to hear stuff like this so that they know Hey, I can do this and I can do this. And I could start now. So by the time I'm Mike's age, I'll be way more wealthier than he is. You know what I'm saying? That's cool, but anyway, now back to you, right? So you come to the states and you said, okay I'm gonna do this. Now, when you first came here, did you come here, like following a job? Did you have a, did you have something lined up already? And then you decided to, or did you just come here and say, okay, I'm gonna figure it out.

Omar Khan:

Oh I had it when I came here, I found a job. So it wasn't that hard. I was in corporate development for a healthcare company, but by that time I had already mentally decided, yeah.

Average Joe Finances:

You already mentally checked.

Omar Khan:

No, it wasn't. I wasn't checked out. I Don know I wasn't the top performers of my, within my group. I was the top performer.

Average Joe Finances:

You could still be a top performer and mentally checkout.

Omar Khan:

That's true. But yeah, you could be surrounded by idiots and that's even better. Cause you look good by default. You look good by default. That didn't happen. But yeah, that's a good point. I should think about that. No, I had just decided, it's like a switch, right? When that switch flips it just flip. And you could still be doing, say whatever you are doing, but when that switch flips, when that realization just happens, it just happens.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah. That's yeah, that, that's exactly what happens. And we've talked about several times, it's that mentality thing, right? It's your mentality. It is like a flip of a switch, right? Where you just completely shift what you wanna do, shift your mindset and shift what you wanna do. That's awesome. Now, when you flip that switch, so you came here and you were in that corporate job. You flipped that switch and said, okay, I'm gonna, I'm gonna start my own business. Tell me like what the steps were from there like when you went from leaving

Omar Khan:

I've got such a simple step. You're not gonna believe. My wife's the physician I'm doing very well. Okay. We're 30, 31. I don't know what age we were exactly. We're doing reasonably well in our careers. Okay. Nobody's like a Mark Zuckerberg, we're definitely not poor by any stretch of the imagination and being financially fair, reasonably financially sophisticated I also understand how taxes work, blah, blah, blah. And then I look at my gross and then I look at my net and I'm like, wow, gross wise it seems like we make a lot of money net wise, we suck. Okay. There's a big gap between gross and net. How do I basically make my like, close that gap as much as possible. Number one, number two, even if I can close that gap as much as possible, if I keep working at corporate job, my incremental gains every year, like incremental, like increase in like income as an example, I can never take quantum leaps. I can never be like, because for instance, no employer in the world is gonna give you a 50% raise year on year for the rest of your life. It's just not gonna happen, man. Okay. I don't care. Who's your employer. I don't give a shit. If you work for Google, it's not gonna happen. Okay. That's just the way it is. Because after a certain while, you are going to be making incremental gains in your income, so you have to change whatever you do to start getting quantum leaps. So it was a taxes part. And this whole even if I crush it's sounded like I make a lot more money, right? Yeah, sure. I'll get 3,4 5% more, correct. Yeah. What am I gonna do with 3,4, 5%, it's not like I was making that much, but it wasn't like I was making a billion dollars, so I make 3% more and it's 30 million more dollars. And I don't know, I go buy like the biggest house in Dallas. Obviously I wasn't doing that. So I realized one was taxes. One was, Hey, even if I crush it, it's not like I can double my income overnight, so why even bother?

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah. So I, I think that's something that not too many people really talk about enough is a lot of people say, okay, your problem is income. You need to go find a way to increase your income. And a lot of people think that means that they need a higher paying job, instead of finding ways to get passive income, but just because you go get a higher paying job and you become a high income, earner, a white collar, you're still gonna be paying a lot of taxes and I don't take a lot example.

Omar Khan:

I did objection out and I said, okay, even if I made 200 grand more like in the next five years, percentage wise, I'm just gonna go up a slab, whatever. As I was in the second highest slab, I'll go into the highest slab of taxes. Shit. I haven't solved my problem. Because I'm still having $20,000 plus a month going in taxes, $20,000 a month. Going to my bottom line, man, I can cause a lot of damage. My 20,000 going to my bottom line a month.

Average Joe Finances:

Absolutely.

Omar Khan:

So haven't really solved the problem

Average Joe Finances:

all right, Omar. So you obviously you've solved that problem now. So what did you do to solve that problem?

Omar Khan:

I haven't fully solved that problem. I still like to make a lot more money. I still like to make a lot more money.

Average Joe Finances:

Of course. But you've definitely been able to solve a large portion of that. Yeah. I have a gut feeling it's through real estate, but how did you secure those, that secure that tax Haven?

Omar Khan:

So the tax Haven primarily is because they're unknown company, I've got all these real estate investments that I manage and run. So all the depreciation , no, nothing fancy you haven't heard about. I'm a real estate professional, all the depreciation writeoffs we get of which I get a mountain every year cause I keep doing deals, right? And all of our deals make money. We make a lot of money for our investors, because of those tax writeoffs and I'm a real estate professional, I'm able to offset my global income. Global means like wise income and any other investments I have. That's how I've been able to so far solve that problem.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah, that's awesome.

Omar Khan:

Nothing groundbreaking that you haven't heard about before?

Average Joe Finances:

No, definitely not, but I there's a key thing there that you said that you're a real estate professional. A lot of people that, you know, one of the things that you gotta realize, if you are, if you're working in real estate, full time as an investor, like this is one of those things you need to get that designation, you need to get that real estate professional designation. So you can start claiming a lot more depreciation for, like you said, your global income, not just what's coming in from the real estate asset, but even more than that. So I think that's that's super important and a key thing I wanna point out. Yeah. Awesome. Okay. So this is,

Omar Khan:

I think I did. Okay. There, did I?

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah. Yeah. I think you did. All right. I think you did just fine. No, Omar, this has been fantastic, man. And it's great to see that, You came from a pretty good place, right? You were you always lived a comfortable life. Like you had everything, set in a good way, but you still said, Hey, I want to be able to do this and keep going for myself. And now build, something for your family, right? You're building generational wealth to keep going and keep this going. Which I think is what a lot of people want to do. And, you can even do this from the point of being broke. As he said earlier, too, I look at what Mark Zuckerberg can't do it

Omar Khan:

In America, if you can't do it in America, , I'm gonna be honest with you, man. You are gonna be in anybody who says they cannot do this in America, they're gonna be in for a world of hurt outside of America. Okay. Yeah. That's all I'm gonna say, if you cannot do this in America. Okay. I'm just gonna tell you the world outside is gonna kick your ass. That's there is no polite way of saying this thing, basically.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah. All right. Fair point and noted and taken. Alright guys, so this has been absolutely awesome Omar. I wanna transition into something now that I call the final round. I wanna ask you four kind of hard-hitting questions. One's one's opinionated. But I think it, it adds a genuine value to everybody that's listening. So if you're ready to go, we'll get that started.

Omar Khan:

That's good.

Average Joe Finances:

All right. Hey, so first question is what's the biggest mistake you've ever made?

Omar Khan:

I think the mistake I think is not, is thinking like a lot of white collar professionals think that just because I know how to do my job, technically, therefore it has some value. And just because look, you're really good at say the technical aspect. Maybe you're an engineer, maybe you're a finance guy. Maybe you build models really well, that there are diminishing returns to that because eventually after a little while, you're just an operator. So what I had to do was, and I'm doing this, cuz it's not natural to me is learn how to become better at marketing, how to become better at outreach, how to become better. Maybe be even more empathetic, genuinely, not just pay through off. So that's the part, which is a weakness, which I'm working on. So I don't know if that's a big mistake, but it's a realization I feel I should have.

Average Joe Finances:

No that's great. And it's humbling that you can point out or you have a weakness, and something that you want to get better at so that is definitely huge. Okay. Awesome. So next question is, what is something that you've learned that you wish you knew when you first started? And I would say when you first, like when you first came to the US and decided to start your own business?

Omar Khan:

Marketing, marketing, because look again, but the flip side to this is if you're all marketing and no substance, that is you are going to get sued very quickly. Okay. But understanding that the world is filled with say technical operational people, but the world is not filled with enough people who have the vision to look beyond their jobs, beyond their careers, see the bigger picture. It's very hard to do that. And part of this is networking and understanding how to develop relationships. Part of this is focusing on obstacles and part of this is on marketing.

Average Joe Finances:

Okay, fantastic. Very fair point. Now, for those that are listening this is the third question that are looking to just get started. So do you have any tips or tricks that you would recommend to someone that is just getting started today?

Omar Khan:

Look, it depends on your background, right? So for instance, if you have a hard technical financial background, like I did, maybe you need to focus on marketing, right? And by focus doesn't mean you go learn everything maybe you partner with somebody's really good on marketing, but maybe you're really good at marketing promotions, all that stuff, but you don't have the hard skill, maybe you partner with somebody who has a hard skill. So that part, and it's not easy to do because in all partnerships, there's always that one person who's doing more than the other work. So it's hard to do that. The more higher you go, you have to keep changing partners to get to a higher level. But yeah, that's what I would recommend. It's a lot about knowing what your strengths are and only playing to your strengths, not your weaknesses.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah, absolutely. And when you're, if you're in a relationship like that, and you see what the other person's doing, that might be a trait that you learn and get better at yourself, so when you move on to your next partner, as you're moving up that is now something that's not a skillset that you're looking for anymore. Cause it's something that you acquired yourself. So that's awesome. Okay. And the final question of the final round is do you have a favorite business investing or real estate related book or podcast or both.

Omar Khan:

Podcast is obviously yours. Number one, obviously number one podcast in the world. Favorite book? No, I just read extensively. So I'm gonna read this book. I'm reading this book called Rise. It's not a business book. It's Rise Of The Data Cloud, or can you see it? It's by it's the Frank Slootman, is like the CEO of Snowflake, it's a data company. I just read, extensively ,there's a, I don't know. You read that book Team of Rivals it's on Abraham Lincoln, Doris Kearns has written it. I'm gonna read that after this. I don't think for instance, I think there is a very big focus these days on reading self-help books and business books. I think one just has to get into the habit of reading. Reading as a means not to solve a specific problem reading as a means to become a better person just understand stuff. So I think once you get into that habit, these things actually that's benefited me. I'm a voracious reader and it's honestly opened way more doors than any self-help book or going to a seminar or a conference, what I've ever done for me, just having that library and knowledge of reading books throughout your life. Because you understand and learn from people's example.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah, that's fantastic. And it's, again, doesn't have to be self-help book, like you're saying it's just expanding on your mind, right?

Omar Khan:

Yeah.

Average Joe Finances:

And just giving you like that mental workout of reading. Yeah so

Omar Khan:

Exactly.

Average Joe Finances:

Yeah. It's fantastic. All right. So that is it for the final round Omar, but I do have one more question for you. So for the people that are listening right now that are like, man, I really like what Omar's talking about. This dude is real. He's not trying to sugar coat anything he's out there just spitting the straight facts and I wanna know more about him and I'd like to see some more information. So if you could, can you share like where people could find more information about you, do you have a website or social media that they could follow. I know you have an awesome Instagram page that I follow. So if you could share with that with us, that'd be fantastic.

Omar Khan:

You can go to our website, boardwalkwealth.com B O A R D walk wealth.com. On the front page, I think it's on the right. There's an email optin page name, email. How'd you find out about us? Click it, get an email, click the link, verify yourself. You'll be added to the mailing list, and then you can hear my profound thoughts. Every two weeks.

Average Joe Finances:

Awesome. Fantastic. Hey you know where to go find him on that website? Are there links to your social media there as well?

Omar Khan:

Yeah, they should be. Yeah.

Average Joe Finances:

Awesome. So go follow him there. If not on Instagram, it's boardwalk wealth. It's. It's been awesome following his stuff. That's actually how we met and got connected and got him on the show today. So Omar, this has been fantastic, man. And you're a no BS kind of guy just spitting the facts. And I definitely can say that. I appreciate that, my listeners appreciate that as well so

Omar Khan:

Thank you so much

Average Joe Finances:

Genuinely enjoyed this conversation, man. And I really appreciate you coming on brother.

Omar Khan:

And thank you for your service. I really appreciate it, sir.

Average Joe Finances:

Hey, thank you. Thank you. All right, man. We're outta here and Aloha from Hawaii.